Luv(sic) references

 




I searched this one pretty hard, and could only come up with what I knew before I started: Frye loved William Blake, William Blake wrote some powerful stuff about love. Laliber over at the hipbase wrote this, and I shoulda just stolen it long ago and saved myself some grief: "Frye had a lot to say about Love in his work and he critiqued some of the biggies (The Bible, Blake, Milton, Billy Qiverlance ect.). In each he takes a look at love in relation to the works

For example Frye has an interesting account about various allegories of Love in a Chapter Six Second Variation: the Garden in his book Words With Power- being a second study of the bible and literature (1990) – which is a follow-up to the first The great code : the Bible and literature Essentially --- love = paradiso terrestre

In the intro to The Double Vision there is a note that Frye loved Auden’s words “we must love one another or die”

In Fearful Symmetry a study of William Blake – Frye notes Blake’s humanizing vision by quoting – Love and harmony combine And around our souls entwine While thy branches mix with mine, And our roots together join Joys upon our branches sit, Chirping loud, and singing sweet; Like gentle streams beneath our feet, Innocence and virtue meet."

The entire song seems to be footnoted as a reference to Frye. He himself was born July 14, 1912 in Sherbrooke, Quebec. Frye's book Fearful Symmetry: A Study of William Blake appeared in 1947 to great acclaim, and many powerful and influential books appeared over the next four and a half decades, including Anatomy of Criticism (1957), The Educated Imagination (1963), The Bush Garden (1971), The Great Code (1982), and Words with Power (1990). He won the Governor General's Literary Award for non-Fiction for his book Northrop Frye on Shakespeare (1986).

Cferneyh adds: "At the show tonight in Calgary (10/29/06), prior to introducing Luv(sic) Gord said something along the lines of: Northrop Frye used to walk up and down Bloor Street in a cape saying "Love is the only virtue there is", and then he'd go home for dinner."